Cold Brew Coffee in Your Fridge

As we transition from June to July, I have made a transition in my daily coffee drinking habits. Truth of it is, I like coffee. The smell. The taste. All of it spells “yum-tastic” in my book. I’m the type of person that wakes up with a cup of Joe and can be found sipping on it at 3 p.m. However, i have a hard time consuming the bitter brew when the mercury rises.

When I called Las Vegas home, the temperatures would remain well above comfortable for months at a time. It was in this location that I turned to iced coffee. Same great taste, smell and texture — just a bit cooler.

Like most coffee shops, I would make hot coffee and ice it down. Sure. Why not? Makes total sense. Iced coffee is just hot coffee cold, right? It wasn’t until I moved to Canada that I learned this wasn’t the best method.

Cold brew (or cold press) is the process of steeping coffee grounds in room temperature or cold water for an extended period of time (usually about 12 hours).  You grind the beans and soak the grounds in water using a 1/3 cup of coffee to 1.5 cups of water ratio.  The grounds are then filtered out of the water using a paper coffee filter, a French Press or a fine metal sieve. (See video below for detailed instructions courtesy of Howdini)

On Monday afternoon, I made my first batch of cold brew and it was nothing short of yumtastic. It’s got flavor, punch and a whole lot of cold goodness.  I used a French Press and let the brew seep overnight in my fridge.

The coffee is strong and should be diluted with ice cubes and milk.  However, there are a couple of benefits to cold brewing:

1) The natural caramel and chocolate flavouring is enhanced due to the fact that the grinds never come in contact with heated water. It will taste different — but a great different

2) Low acidity.According to The Daily Beast.com, “cold-brewed coffee is 67 percent less acidic than hot-brewed. Without all that acid, the burnt flavor that plagues hot-brewed coffee is eliminated. Plus, the reduced acid makes it healthier for your stomach and your teeth.” Win. Win. . . . Win!

Oh . . . and one more added benefit. If you do like the flavor better or your tummy likes the low-acidity of cold brew, simply warm it up. It retains these two benefits — even served hot.

So, during the summer months, I will be putting my French Press to work as my cold brewing system. And I couldn’t be happier!

Comments

  1. Pingback: Cold Brew Coffee in Your Fridge | Mike and Weegee Sachtjen

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *